13 January 2012

—1862—
Farming Business

#81



The word agriculture is compounded of ager, a field, and culture, tilling. Agriculture is justly thought to be the most ancient art, and it is certainly the most useful. Even Adam in Paradise, practiced one branch of this art; he was put into the garden of Eden, to dress it. Though other employments are often more lucrative to individuals than husbandry, none is so advantageous to the world. If it be a slower way of gaining wealth than some others, it is perhaps the least hazardous of any. The farmer depends not on winds and waves, like the merchant and mariner, nor on the good will of his neighbors, like the mechanic, for employment and bread. Besides, the business of farming is adapted to promote the health of the body and the cheerfulness and contentment of the mind. In a philosophic view, says one, agriculture is great and extensive. In a political view it is important. As a possession, it strengthens the mind, without enervating the body. In morals, it tends to increase virtue, without introducing vice. In Religion it naturally inspires piety, devotion, and a dependence on Providence. It is a rational, agreeable amusement to the man of leisure, and a boundless source of wealth to the industrious.
[Leavitt’s Farmer's Almanac]

3 comments:

Ron C said...

Herrick:

Catching up on your blog and had a look at the Mike Rowe video down on the side. I am not sure if you have seen this TED talk, but Mike talks about that episode in detail. I think you'll like it.

http://www.ted.com/talks/mike_rowe_celebrates_dirty_jobs.html

Sincerely:

Ron

Matt B said...

Wow, I think this may be my favorite A.N. post to date. Several good quotes in there.

Nancy said...

What a great post!